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Good Eats>Turkey recipes?
pektel 08:30 AM 11-23-2014
This is the third year I'm having the in laws over for thanksgiving. The past 2 years I've made a good bird. Some Alton Brown recipe I got from the interweb.

I make a great dressing (I never stuff the bird, so I can't call it stuffing) and sage gravy, so I usually just rely on those to carry the turkey.

Just wondering if anyone else around here is responsible for thanksgiving dinner, and have any turkey recipes or pointers they'd like to share. I know there are some excellent cooks among us, and would love some input. I am no stranger to taking my favorite parts of different recipes and making it work. So even if it's one thing you always do, or something to Never do, it's all helpful!
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pektel 08:36 AM 11-23-2014
I should add: the inlaws are not fans of smoked/BBQ anything. So no smoked turkey. And no fryer. Only cooking method will be my electric oven.
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Stevez 08:42 AM 11-23-2014
I was just getting ready to recommend smoked turkey until I read your second post, so I wont! I will recommend that you brine the bird for 24 hours. I did a smoked turkey for an early Thanksgiving this year and even with 6 hours on the smoker it was incredibly moist, tender and flavorful. I did the Apple Brine recipe on the Virtual Weber Bullet website. Great brine. Also, just make sure you don't over cook and cook to 165/breast and 175 or so in the thigh. Good luck!
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Porch Dweller 09:23 AM 11-23-2014
I love smok...nevermind. :-)
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shilala 09:26 AM 11-23-2014
Tons of butter and mushrooms in the stuffing, and you got a winner.
Eat the skin, use the drippings for gravy, and throw the turkey in the back yard for the Bumphus hounds. :-)
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pektel 09:57 AM 11-23-2014
I make a sage dressing in a separate crock in the oven. I start with the pepperidge farm sage and onion stuffing per package directions. Then add whatever I feel like (a couple fresh, torn sage leaves for example). I simmer the giblets and baste the dressing with that. Then chop up the simmered heart and gizzard and add them to the dressing. I don't really like the liver so I leave that out, and I'll pick at the neck meat while cooking. One of those "cooks treats" that never make it past the kitchen.

I Also add an egg to make it more sticky than dry.
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pektel 10:05 AM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by shilala:
Tons of butter and mushrooms in the stuffing, and you got a winner.
Eat the skin, use the drippings for gravy, and throw the turkey in the back yard for the Bumphus hounds. :-)
For some odd reason, I've never added mushrooms to the dressing. That will definitely change this year. I just have to chop them up small so they can't see them.

Great suggestion, Scott. :-)
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Porch Dweller 10:40 AM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by shilala:
Tons of butter and mushrooms in the stuffing, and you got a winner.
Eat the skin, use the drippings for gravy, and throw the turkey in the back yard for the Bumphus hounds. :-)
Our dressing is sliced mushrooms and celery, minced onion, and bread cubes, with lots of butter used to cook the veggies and a little chicken stock to make it even moister. A little poultry seasoning and pepper and it's ready to get baked.
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pnoon 11:11 AM 11-23-2014
An unusual but wonderful addition to the stuffing is water chestnuts.
:-)
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CigarNut 12:09 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by pnoon:
An unusual but wonderful addition to the stuffing is water chestnuts.
:-)
Love it!
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pektel 12:14 PM 11-23-2014
I have some picky eaters around the table, peter. It's an excellent suggestion. I've tried the water chestnut addition before. I loved it. They did not.

I guess the bright side was I got all the stuffing I could eat. And then some.
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Chainsaw13 12:18 PM 11-23-2014
Turkey roulade. Boned breast, stuffed, rolled, tied, roasted.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...y-roulade.html

Use your own stuffing if you'd think the picky eaters won't like the one in the recipe.
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AdamJoshua 12:30 PM 11-23-2014
Well since I read this thread this morning, I went out and got the ingredients to make stuff, yes with tons of butter and mushrooms, Scott.

I used to do the turkey fairly traditional (I suppose if it was literally traditional it would be a fish not a turkey), except I would season button under the skin covering the breasts and the sides.
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Porch Dweller 12:44 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by pektel:
I have some picky eaters around the table, peter. It's an excellent suggestion. I've tried the water chestnut addition before. I loved it. They did not.

I guess the bright side was I got all the stuffing I could eat. And then some.
I get annoyed at picky eaters. Maybe it's just because I really enjoy cooking and eating.
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smokin5 12:55 PM 11-23-2014
When I host Thanksgiving, it's usually for 15-20 people, so I make lots.

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to Thanksgiving turkey.
Rub outside with olive oil/melted butter & salt; sprinkle with black
(or white) pepper, sage, thyme & rosemary; rub cavity with same;
cut apple or orange & put in cavity with rosemary sprigs. Add about
1/2" of liquid in pan (broth or water or white wine, or a mix of them),
cook at 325 degrees until done (165 degree thigh). First 2/3 cooking
time covered, last 1/3 uncovered. Baste occasionally.

I also do a separate turkey breast the day before, similar prep but
covered with bacon strips, cooked at 350 degrees uncovered.
I slice that when cooled, refrigerate it, & heat it in the oven with
extra broth on Thursday.

I make 2 kinds of stuffing casserole-style (I don't stuff the bird).
One is the more traditional white bread/celery/carrot/onion/sage,
the other is cornbread/mild sausage/apple/onion.
A time-saving tip is to mix the stuffing the day before & refrigerate
in well-sealed casserole dish. Then you just pop in oven when the
turkey comes out on Thursday.

And always, ALWAYS make the gravy from scratch, not a jar or packet.
Roue (flour/butter sauteed until golden brown) is a must, as are the
browned bits & grease/juice from the cooked turkey. Add broth &
it's done in the 30 minutes the cooked turkey rests before carving.

Lastly, keep a glass of wine/liquor handy at all times - a cook's best helper!
[Reply]
MarkinOR 01:53 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by smokin5:
Lastly, keep a glass of wine/liquor handy at all times - a cook's best helper!
:-)Was that a glass or a bottle Eric?:-)
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pektel 01:59 PM 11-23-2014
Bottle. If you have to ask me if it's too early to drink, you're an amateur and we can't be friends. :-)
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pektel 02:06 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by smokin5:
When I host Thanksgiving, it's usually for 15-20 people, so I make lots.

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to Thanksgiving turkey.
Rub outside with olive oil/melted butter & salt; sprinkle with black
(or white) pepper, sage, thyme & rosemary; rub cavity with same;
cut apple or orange & put in cavity with rosemary sprigs. Add about
1/2" of liquid in pan (broth or water or white wine, or a mix of them),
cook at 325 degrees until done (165 degree thigh). First 2/3 cooking
time covered, last 1/3 uncovered. Baste occasionally.

I also do a separate turkey breast the day before, similar prep but
covered with bacon strips, cooked at 350 degrees uncovered.
I slice that when cooled, refrigerate it, & heat it in the oven with
extra broth on Thursday.

I make 2 kinds of stuffing casserole-style (I don't stuff the bird).
One is the more traditional white bread/celery/carrot/onion/sage,
the other is cornbread/mild sausage/apple/onion.
A time-saving tip is to mix the stuffing the day before & refrigerate
in well-sealed casserole dish. Then you just pop in oven when the
turkey comes out on Thursday.

And always, ALWAYS make the gravy from scratch, not a jar or packet.
Roue (flour/butter sauteed until golden brown) is a must, as are the
browned bits & grease/juice from the cooked turkey. Add broth &
it's done in the 30 minutes the cooked turkey rests before carving.

Lastly, keep a glass of wine/liquor handy at all times - a cook's best helper!
Great ideas, Eric. I like the idea of making the dressing the night before. I'll just have to baste the turkey with pan broth on Thursday. I've ALWAYS basted with the giblet stock. My late grandma taught me that when I was a kid. I asked her what she had in the pot on the stove all day, that she kept using to baste the turkey and stuffing. I've done it that way since my first turkey.

Since I also do dressing instead of stuffing, I find it a good way to incorporate the flavor into the casserole dish.
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pektel 02:20 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by Porch Dweller:
I get annoyed at picky eaters. Maybe it's just because I really enjoy cooking and eating.
I'm with ya. I do ALL the cooking at my house. All the different tastes to try, and only my 7 year old and myself "get it."

He actually is a lot more adventurous than I am with new foods. My 4 year old would be happy with pancakes, grilled cheese, and hotdogs until the end of time.

My 7 year old had some sage advice for me when I was trying to get his brother to try sauerkraut. He stopped me from pitching the idea by saying "remember, dad: everyone has their own taste buds."

The kid is smart. :-)
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pektel 02:21 PM 11-23-2014
Originally Posted by Chainsaw13:
Turkey roulade. Boned breast, stuffed, rolled, tied, roasted.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...y-roulade.html

Use your own stuffing if you'd think the picky eaters won't like the one in the recipe.
That sounds awesome! I think I'll test that out on a normal weekday first.
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