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Good Eats>Sous vide
Chainsaw13 06:23 AM 12-14-2015
Originally Posted by bonjing:
Why such long cook times?
The long cook times are a factor of the low temps the items are being cooked at. The extra time allows for the proteins to come to temp all the way through the item. In the case of things like chicken, turkey, the extended times also pasteurize the meats, making them safe to eat, but not having to get cooked at the higher temps associated with baking/roasting. Lastly, for items with a lot of collagen and connective tissues, the extra time is needed to break them down. Same concept as doing a braise or bbq.
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mosesbotbol 09:08 AM 12-14-2015
Originally Posted by Chainsaw13:
Lastly, for items with a lot of collagen and connective tissues, the extra time is needed to break them down. Same concept as doing a braise or bbq.
I hear my buddy say this part a lot.
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T.G 08:29 AM 12-15-2015
Trying to determine if the Wi-Fi model is worth the extra $70.

Aside from better wireless range and being able to configure a router to allow one to communicate with the cooker from outside your home (or wherever you have the cooker set up), is there any other difference between the BT and the Wi-Fi?

Is the phone app even any good? And does anyone really even use it to control the cooker? Play store reviews for the android version are mixed.
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Chainsaw13 08:54 AM 12-15-2015
Originally Posted by T.G:
Trying to determine if the Wi-Fi model is worth the extra $70.

Aside from better wireless range and being able to configure a router to allow one to communicate with the cooker from outside your home (or wherever you have the cooker set up), is there any other difference between the BT and the Wi-Fi?

Is the phone app even any good? And does anyone really even use it to control the cooker? Play store reviews for the android version are mixed.
Take it for what it's worth, but I don't use the BT/app all that much with my limited cooking with the Anova. The short range, always having to connect when you reopen the app. The one thing i do use it for is to set the timer on the Anova. Easier than on the unit itself.
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bvilchez 10:51 AM 12-15-2015
So I see this thread and told the wife I want one for Christmas. We shall see what arrives.

Dom....you just keep pushing us down a different slope brother.
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jonumberone 12:09 PM 12-15-2015
Originally Posted by T.G:
Trying to determine if the Wi-Fi model is worth the extra $70.
I have the Wi-Fi model. At the time I ordered mine it was $30 cheaper than the Bluetooth model.
I think whether or not it's worth it depends on how you plan on using it.
I'm always monitoring pit and meat temps when I bbq, so doing the same thing with the Anova appeals to me.
If you don't see the need to start it up, monitor it, or access it remotely, than it's probably not worth it.
I personally like the thought of being able to monitor it, but I don't think I'll ever start it remotely.

Originally Posted by T.G:
Aside from better wireless range and being able to configure a router to allow one to communicate with the cooker from outside your home (or wherever you have the cooker set up), is there any other difference between the BT and the Wi-Fi?
As far as I know, that is the only difference.
All the specs on the Anova website are the same, and the units look identical
I found this blurb in a review on CNet

Originally Posted by :
This is the company's second connected product for home cooks; the previous Anova Precision cooker only has Bluetooth, which gives users the ability to control the cooker from across the house, but not across town. Besides the addition of Wi-Fi, the newest Anova isn't much different than the Bluetooth-only model, which costs $20 less. Both cookers are nearly identical, as is their cooking performances. The most notable difference is the availability of the bare-bones app that pairs with the Wi-Fi unit. You can connect to the Anova Wi-Fi cooker from anywhere, but the app is pretty limited in its commands. Anova's previous app for the Bluetooth-only model, which is available for iOS and Android, is far more robust and helpful for using the precision cooker. Fortunately, you can use the heartier app on the Wi-Fi cooker. Just brace yourself for double notifications from both apps.
Originally Posted by T.G:
Is the phone app even any good? And does anyone really even use it to control the cooker? Play store reviews for the android version are mixed.
Being alerted when the water comes to temp and being able to set the timer are nice features, but the range sucks.
The few times I let the Anova heat the water, I used my Maverick thermometer to alert me since the app can't see the Anova from my lounge.
I haven't seen the bare bones Wi-Fi app Cnet mentioned for android, so I haven't had a chance to even try any of the Wi-Fi features.
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jonumberone 12:23 PM 12-15-2015
Originally Posted by bvilchez:
So I see this thread and told the wife I want one for Christmas. We shall see what arrives.

Dom....you just keep pushing us down a different slope brother.
My pleasure, Jay! :-)
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CigarNut 01:32 PM 12-15-2015
I have the Bluetooth model and I use the app all the time -- I use it to set the time and temperature and to get alerts -- the app alerts when the water is at temperature and when the time has completed.

I periodically check the app to verify that the temperature is holding.

I wish that the app would alert me when the temp is close -- the Anova beeps when the water is within 2 or 3 degrees, but the app does not (yet).

The BT model is limited on range, but the extra dollars for the Wi-Fi was not worth it for me as I am generally within BT range -- or not out of range for very long.

I really like the Anova, but for me it's more about being able to cook things during the winter that I would normally grill (and it's too cold or too wet or too windy to grill). I have not yet found a food where the Sous Vide method is better than grilling. Then again, I have only used it twice :-)
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T.G 06:00 PM 12-15-2015
Thanks for the info, guys. Just ordered the BT unit to play with.


Dom, we need to talk about that Lang split and if I can get a trailer hitch on a BMW.
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jonumberone 07:07 AM 12-16-2015
Originally Posted by T.G:
Thanks for the info, guys. Just ordered the BT unit to play with.


Dom, we need to talk about that Lang split and if I can get a trailer hitch on a BMW.
:-)
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omowasu 07:48 PM 12-17-2015
I have the exact same Anova sous vide appliance, and have done both steaks and chicken in the Anova. I would really like to try a brisket soon, first preparing in the Anova and then smoking at a low temperature.

I have similar issues with the sear. A very hot charcoal grill tends to work well for the finish (red hot coals, 90 seconds on first side, 60 on other).
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mosesbotbol 05:27 AM 12-18-2015
Originally Posted by omowasu:
I would really like to try a brisket soon, first preparing in the Anova and then smoking at a low temperature.
Would be interesting to cold smoke the brisket first then SV it.
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363 07:35 AM 12-18-2015
Dom all of that looks great! this is something I have wanted to look into.
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DBall 06:03 PM 12-18-2015
doing my first long cook... Chuck at 136 for 48 hours... :-)
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Chainsaw13 06:06 PM 12-18-2015
Originally Posted by DBall:
doing my first long cook... Chuck at 136 for 48 hours... :-)
Cannibalism? :-)

Contemplating a 72 hour cook of some pork shanks. Problem is I want them for dinner on Sunday. Should've planned better.
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AdamJoshua 10:01 PM 12-18-2015
Originally Posted by DBall:
doing my first long cook... Chuck at 136 for 48 hours... :-)
Poor Chuck, never had a chance. :-)
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jonumberone 06:35 AM 12-21-2015
Did a small 5lb rib roast yesterday.
First time I was really happy with the sear I got in a cast iron pan.
This time I used way more oil. Somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 an inch.
A little bit more mess, but it rally helped the Maillard reaction along.
Did this a little more well to appease my wife. 134 for 4.5 hours.

Image

Image

I was shocked at the large chunks of fat when I cut into it.
From the outside there was no indication that there would be that much fat.
But it was really easy to just eat around it.

Image

Honestly, it was one of the best rib roasts I have made.
I let the roast wet age for close to 60 days, and it really showed in unbelievable tenderness that I have never achieved before.
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mosesbotbol 07:58 AM 12-21-2015
^^ Great Stuff ^^ looks awesome and making me hungry
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T.G 08:20 AM 12-21-2015
Originally Posted by Chainsaw13:
Hey Dom, I'm thinking of picking up one of these for the searing process.

http://www.amazon.com/Searzall-Torch...keywords=anova

Hope you ordered early...

Image
Attached: searzall.jpg (63.3 KB) 
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CigarNut 08:33 AM 12-21-2015
Originally Posted by jonumberone:
Did a small 5lb rib roast yesterday.
First time I was really happy with the sear I got in a cast iron pan.
This time I used way more oil. Somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 an inch.
A little bit more mess, but it rally helped the Maillard reaction along.
Did this a little more well to appease my wife. 134 for 4.5 hours.

Image

Image

I was shocked at the large chunks of fat when I cut into it.
From the outside there was no indication that there would be that much fat.
But it was really easy to just eat around it.

Image

Honestly, it was one of the best rib roasts I have made.
I let the roast wet age for close to 60 days, and it really showed in unbelievable tenderness that I have never achieved before.
Wow, Dom! That looks fantastic! I would love to try that, but I might need a bigger pot :-)
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